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Lice Infestation (Pediculosis)

What is Lice Infestation?

Lice infestation is a condition where tiny insects called lice live on the skin, hair, or clothing of a person and feed on their blood. Lice can cause itching, irritation, and sometimes infections. Lice can be spread by close contact with an infested person or by sharing personal items such as hats, combs, or towels. There are different types of lice that affect different parts of the body, such as head lice, body lice, and pubic lice.

dermatologist-treating-lice

What are the signs and symptoms of Lice Infestation?

Some of the signs and symptoms of lice infestation are:

  • Intense itching on the scalp, body or in the genital area. This is an allergic reaction to louse bites.
  • A tickling feeling from movement of hair. This is caused by the lice crawling on the skin or hair.
  • The presence of lice on the scalp, body, clothing, or pubic or other body hair. Adult lice may be about the size of a sesame seed or slightly larger. They are tan or grayish in color and avoid light.
  • Lice eggs (nits) on hair shafts. Nits are tiny, oval-shaped eggs that stick to hair shafts near the scalp. They may be white, yellow, or brown in color and may look like dandruff, but they cannot be easily brushed out of hair.
  • Sores on the scalp, neck and shoulders. Scratching can lead to small red bumps that may sometimes get infected with bacteria.
  • Bite marks, especially around the waist, groin, upper thighs and pubic area. These are caused by the lice feeding on blood from the skin.

What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Lice Infestation?

Some of the treatments that are available at the dermatologist for lice infestation are:

  • Prescription shampoos or lotions that contain different ingredients than the over-the-counter products. These may include malathion, benzyl alcohol, or spinosad. These products are applied to the hair and scalp and left for a certain amount of time before rinsing. They may be more effective against lice that are resistant to other treatments.
  • Oral prescription drug such as ivermectin. This is a tablet that is taken by mouth and kills lice by affecting their nervous system. It is usually given in two doses, eight days apart. This drug is typically used when other treatments have not been effective or when there is a widespread infestation.
  • Manual removal of lice and nits. This involves using a fine-tooth comb or a special device to comb through the hair and remove the lice and their eggs. This method can be time-consuming and tedious, but it can be done at home or with the help of a professional. Manual removal may be necessary in addition to other treatments, especially for pubic lice or eyelash lice.
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FAQ About Lice Infestation

How is lice infestation diagnosed?

Lice infestation is diagnosed by examining the hair and scalp for nits, nymphs (immature lice), or adult lice. A fine-toothed comb or a special device may be used to comb through the hair and remove the lice and nits. A magnifying glass or a microscope may be needed to see the lice or nits clearlySometimes, a skin scraping or a hair sample may be taken and sent to a laboratory for confirmation.

Is lice infestation a sign of poor hygiene or an unclean environment?

  •  No. Lice infestation is not a sign of poor hygiene or an unclean environment. Anyone can get lice regardless of their personal cleanliness or living conditions. Lice are not attracted to dirt or grease, but to human blood. Lice can infest people of any age, gender, race, or socioeconomic status.

Can lice infestation affect other animals or pets?

No. Lice are species-specific, meaning they only infest humans and do not affect other animals or pets. Lice cannot be transmitted from animals to humans or vice versa.

Can lice infestation be cured?

Yes. Lice infestation can be cured with proper treatment and prevention measures. However, it may take some time and effort to get rid of all the lice and nits from the hair and the environment. It is important to follow the instructions for the treatment carefully and to repeat the treatment after 7 to 10 days to kill any newly hatched lice. It is also important to check the hair and scalp regularly for signs of reinfestation and to treat it promptly if needed.

 

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for Lice Infestation?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for Lice Infestation to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Rubella (German Measles)

    What is Rubella?

    Rubella is a contagious disease caused by a virus that can cause a red rash on the skin, fever, sore throat, and swollen lymph nodes. It is also known as German measles or three-day measles. Rubella is usually mild, but it can cause serious problems for unborn babies if their mothers get infected during pregnancy. 

    woman-couch-feeling-sick

    What are the signs and symptoms of Rubella?

    The signs and symptoms of rubella are usually mild and may include a red rash, fever, headache, runny nose, red eyes, swollen lymph nodes, joint pain, and general discomfort. Some people may not have any symptoms at all. The rash typically starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body, and lasts for about three days. The symptoms usually appear two to three weeks after exposure to the virus.

    What are the causes of Rubella?

    • Rubella is caused by a virus that can be spread through direct contact with the saliva or mucus of an infected person, or through the air by respiratory droplets from coughing or sneezing.
    • Humans are the only known host of the rubella virus.
    • Rubella can also be transmitted from a pregnant woman to her unborn baby, which can result in serious birth defects or fetal death.

    FAQ About Rubella

    How is rubella transmitted?

    The rubella virus is transmitted by airborne droplets when infected people sneeze or cough. Humans are the only known host. Rubella can also be transmitted from a pregnant woman to her unborn baby, which can result in serious birth defects or fetal death.

    How is rubella diagnosed?

    Rubella can be diagnosed by a blood test that detects antibodies to the virus. A positive test indicates either a current or past infection. A negative test indicates that the person is susceptible to rubella and should be vaccinatedRubella can also be confirmed by isolating the virus from a throat swab or urine sample.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for Rubella?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for Rubella to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Scarlet Fever

    What is Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is an infection that stems from the Group A Streptococcus (“strep”) bacteria. One of its hallmark signs is a rash with a texture resembling sandpaper, accompanied by other related symptoms. This condition typically follows a strep infection in the throat, commonly known as strep pharyngitis or strep throat, although it can also occur after a strep skin infection. The rash observed in scarlet fever is a result of a toxin produced by the strep bacteria.

    In the past, scarlet fever used to be prevalent among children aged 2 to 10; however, it has become relatively uncommon nowadays. The reasons for this shift remain unknown, particularly considering that there hasn’t been a decrease in the incidence of strep throat or strep skin infections.

    woman-couch-feeling-sick

    What are the signs and symptoms of Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is typically set off by an infection in the throat caused by strep bacteria. This leads to the emergence of the following symptoms:

    • Fever and shivering
    • Headache
    • Throat that is red and painful
    • Enlarged tonsils
    • Lymph nodes in the neck that are swollen (often called “swollen glands”)

    Around 12 to 48 hours after these symptoms manifest, the characteristic rash of scarlet fever begins. This rash is vividly red, akin to sunburn, and it frequently possesses a delicate texture resembling sandpaper or goosebumps. Initially, it tends to appear in areas like the underarms, groin, and neck, subsequently spreading to the torso, back, arms, and legs. Additional symptoms of scarlet fever encompass:

    • A lightened area encircling the mouth
    • A white-coated tongue with red dots (referred to as white strawberry tongue)
    • A red strawberry tongue or raspberry tongue, which arises when the white coating on the tongue sheds and reveals a red surface with red dots
    • Darkened or reddened skin creases, particularly noticeable in the elbow’s bend, referred to as Pastia’s lines

    Occasionally, scarlet fever follows a skin infection caused by streptococcus bacteria, such as infections in burns, wounds, or impetigo. In these instances, the rash and associated skin symptoms materialize, but there are no concurrent symptoms linked to strep throat.

    What are the causes of Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is caused by a type of bacteria called Group A streptococcus (Group A strep), which can also cause strep throat. Sometimes, the bacteria produce a toxin that makes the skin turn red and bumpy. This is what causes the rash of scarlet feverScarlet fever is contagious and can spread through contact with an infected person or their respiratory droplets.

    FAQ About Scarlet Fever

    How is scarlet fever transmitted?

    Scarlet fever is highly contagious and can spread through respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes of an infected person. It can also be contracted by touching surfaces or objects contaminated with the bacteria.

    How is scarlet fever spread?

    Scarlet fever is spread by contact with an infected person or their respiratory droplets. 

    Is scarlet fever contagious?

    Yes, scarlet fever is contagious. It can spread from person to person until 24 hours after starting antibiotics.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for Scarlet Fever?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for Scarlet Fever to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Necrotizing Fasciitis

    What is Necrotizing Fasciitis (Flesh-eating Bacteria)

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but serious bacterial infection that causes the death of the skin and underlying tissues. It can affect any part of the body, but it is more common in the limbs, genitals, and abdomen. It can spread quickly and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. The symptoms include severe pain, fever, redness, swelling, blisters, and black spots on the skin. The bacteria that cause necrotizing fasciitis usually enter the body through a wound or injury. People with weak immune systems, diabetes, obesity, alcoholism, or drug abuse are more at risk of getting this infection. The diagnosis is based on the symptoms, medical imaging, and tissue biopsy. The treatment involves surgery to remove the infected tissue, antibiotics to kill the bacteria, and supportive care to prevent complications.

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    What are the signs and symptoms of Necrotizing Fasciitis

    The signs and symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis can vary depending on the stage and severity of the infection. According to the sources I found, some of the common signs and symptoms are:

    • A red, warm, or swollen area of skin that spreads quickly
    • Severe pain, including pain beyond the area of the skin that is red, warm, or swollen
    • Fever
    • Ulcers, blisters, or black spots on the skin
    • Changes in the color of the skin
    • Flulike symptoms, such as body aches, sore throat, nausea, diarrhea, and chills

    What are the causes of Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but serious bacterial infection that causes the death of the skin and underlying tissues. It can be caused by different types of bacteria, but the most common cause is group A Streptococcus (GAS), also known as “flesh-eating bacteria”GAS bacteria usually enter the body through a break in the skin, such as a cut, scrape, burn, insect bite, puncture wound, or surgical woundOther types of bacteria that can cause necrotizing fasciitis include Vibrio vulnificus, which live in water, and Staphylococcus aureus, which can cause staph infections. These bacteria can also enter the body through wounds or injuries. People with weak immune systems, diabetes, obesity, alcoholism, or drug abuse are more at risk of getting this infection. Necrotizing fasciitis can spread quickly and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. The symptoms include severe pain, fever, redness, swelling, blisters, and black spots on the skinThe diagnosis is based on the symptoms, medical imaging, and tissue biopsyThe treatment involves surgery to remove the infected tissue, antibiotics to kill the bacteria, and supportive care to prevent complications.

    FAQ About Necrotizing Fasciitis

    How is necrotizing fasciitis diagnosed?

    The diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is based on the symptoms, medical imaging, and tissue biopsy. However, diagnosis can be difficult and acting fast is key. Delayed diagnosis and treatment can increase the risk of death and amputation.

    Who is at risk of getting necrotizing fasciitis?

    People with weak immune systems, diabetes, obesity, alcoholism, or drug abuse are more at risk of getting this infection. Other risk factors include cancer, pregnancy, chronic kidney disease, peripheral vascular disease, and malnutrition.

    What are the complications of necrotizing fasciitis?

    Necrotizing fasciitis can cause serious complications such as sepsis (a life-threatening response to infection), shock (a sudden drop in blood pressure), organ failure (when one or more organs stop working properly), gangrene (when tissue dies due to lack of blood flow), scarring (permanent marks on the skin), disfigurement (changes in appearance), and disability (loss of function or ability).

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for Necrotizing Fasciitis?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for Necrotizing Fasciitis to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Measles

    What is Measles

    Measles is a viral infection that affects the respiratory system and causes a red, itchy rash on the skin. It is very contagious and can spread through the air or by direct contact with an infected person. Measles can be prevented by getting vaccinated and can be treated with supportive care and medication to ease the symptoms.

    woman-couch-feeling-sick

    What are the signs and symptoms of Measles

    The signs and symptoms of measles are:

    • High fever, usually above 104°F (40°C), that lasts for four to seven days.
    • Cough, runny nose, sore throat, and inflamed eyes (conjunctivitis).
    • Tiny white spots with bluish-white centers on a red background inside the mouth, also called Koplik’s spots.
    • A red, blotchy rash that starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body over several days

    Measles Complications and Risk Factors for Severe Illness

    Measles is a viral infection that can cause serious and sometimes fatal complications, especially in children and people with weak immune systems. 

    Some of the common complications of measles are:

    • Otitis media: An ear infection that can cause pain, fever, and hearing loss.
    • Bronchopneumonia: A lung infection that can cause cough, difficulty breathing, and chest pain.
    • Laryngotracheobronchitis: An inflammation of the voice box, windpipe, and airways that can cause hoarseness, wheezing, and breathing problems.
    • Diarrhea: A condition that can cause dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and weight loss.
    • Encephalitis: A brain inflammation that can cause seizures, coma, and permanent brain damage.
    • Blindness: A result of eye damage from measles virus or secondary infections.
    • Death: A result of severe complications or organ failure.

    Some of the risk factors for developing severe illness from measles are:

    • Age: Children under 5 years and adults over 20 years are more likely to have complications from measles.
    • Malnutrition: People who are undernourished or lack vitamin A are more prone to measles infections and complications.
    • Immune status: People who have weakened immune systems due to HIV/AIDS, cancer, organ transplant, or other conditions are more susceptible to measles and its complications.
    • Vaccination status: People who are unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated against measles are at higher risk of getting infected and having complications.
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    FAQ About Measles

    How do you get measles?

    You can get measles if you are exposed to the measles virus, which is normally passed through respiratory droplets when an infected person sneezes, coughs, or talks.

    How is measles diagnosed?

    Measles can be diagnosed by a blood test or by examining the rash and other signs.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for Measles?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for Measles to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Cutaneous Anthrax

    What is Cutaneous Anthrax? 

    Cutaneous anthrax is a type of anthrax infection that affects the skin and tissue around the site of infection. It is caused by a spore-forming bacterium called Bacillus anthracis. It usually enters the body through a cut or scrape on the skin when a person handles infected animals or contaminated animal products. Cutaneous anthrax is the most common and least dangerous form of anthrax, and it can be treated with antibiotics.

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    What are the signs and symptoms of  Cutaneous Anthrax?

    The signs and symptoms of cutaneous anthrax are:

    • A group of small blisters or bumps that may itch
    • Swelling around the sore
    • A painless skin sore (ulcer) with a black center that appears after the small blisters or bumps

     

    What are some of the causes of Cutaneous Anthrax?

    Some of the causes of cutaneous anthrax are:

    • Exposure to infected domestic or wild grazing animals or their products, such as wool, hides, or hair.
    • Contact with anthrax spores that enter the body through a cut or scrape on the skin.
    • Biological weapons that release anthrax spores in powder or spray form. However, this is very rare and there has not been an anthrax attack in the United States since 2001.

    What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Cutaneous Anthrax?

    The treatments available at the dermatologist for cutaneous anthrax are mainly antibiotics and antitoxins. Antibiotics are used to kill the anthrax bacteria and prevent them from multiplying and spreading in the body. Antitoxins are used to neutralize the toxins produced by the anthrax bacteria that cause severe illness. Some of the antibiotics that can be used for cutaneous anthrax are ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, and amoxicillinSome of the antitoxins that can be used for inhalation anthrax are raxibacumab and obiltoxaximab. These medications are given in addition to antibiotics and are available to doctors through the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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    FAQ About Cutaneous Anthrax

    How is cutaneous anthrax diagnosed?

     The preferred diagnostic procedure for cutaneous anthrax is staining the ulcer exudate with methylene blue or Giemsa stain, which can differentiate Bacillus anthracis from other bacteria.

    How common is cutaneous anthrax?

    Cutaneous anthrax is the most common form of anthrax infection, accounting for more than 95% of cases worldwide.

    Is cutaneous anthrax contagious?

    There is no evidence that cutaneous anthrax is transmitted from person to person, but it is possible that anthrax skin lesions may be contagious through direct contact or through contact with a contaminated object (fomite). Therefore, it is advisable to avoid touching or sharing personal items with someone who has cutaneous anthrax.

    What are the risk factors for cutaneous anthrax?

    The risk factors for cutaneous anthrax include exposure to infected domestic or wild grazing animals or their products, such as wool, hides, or hair; contact with anthrax spores that enter the body through a cut or scrape on the skin; and biological weapons that release anthrax spores in powder or spray form.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for Cutaneous Anthrax?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for Cutaneous Anthrax to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Athlete’s Foot

    What is Athlete’s Foot?

    Athlete’s foot is a fungal skin infection that usually affects the area between the toes. It can cause itching, burning, scaling, peeling, and sometimes blisters on the feet. It is contagious and can spread through contact with infected skin or surfaces. Athlete’s foot can be treated with antifungal medications, but it may recur if not prevented.

    athletes-foot

    What are the signs and symptoms of Athlete’s Foot?

    Some of the signs and symptoms of athlete’s foot are:

    • Itching, stinging, and burning between your toes or on the soles of your feet.
    • Scaly, peeling, or cracked skin between the toes, on the bottom of the foot, or on the heel.
    • Blisters on your feet that itch or ooze fluid.
    • Thickened, crumbly, or discolored toenails (in rare cases).

    What are the causes of Athlete’s Foot?

    The causes of athlete’s foot are fungal infections that grow on the skin of the feet. The fungi that cause athlete’s foot are called dermatophytes. They can be spread through direct contact with someone who has the infection, or by touching surfaces that are contaminated with the fungi, such as towels, floors, and shoesThe fungi thrive in warm, moist environments, such as locker rooms, showers, and swimming poolsPeople who sweat a lot, wear tight shoes, or have minor skin injuries on their feet are more likely to get athlete’s foot.

    What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Athlete’s Foot?

    Some of the treatments that are available at the dermatologist for athlete’s foot are:

    • Prescription-strength cream or ointment, such as clotrimazole (Lotrisone), econazole (Ecoza, Spectazole) or ciclopirox (Loprox, Penlac).
    • Prescription antifungal pills, such as terbinafine (Lamisil) or itraconazole (Sporanox, Tolsura).
    • Prescription antifungal cleanser, powder or lotion.
    • Prescription antifungal drugs to prevent recurrence of severe cases.

    These treatments are usually more effective than over-the-counter products and can clear up the infection faster. However, they may also have more side effects and interactions with other medications. You should consult your dermatologist before starting any treatment for athlete’s foot.

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    Athlete’s Foot: Myths and Facts

    • Myth: Only athletes can get athlete’s foot.
    • Fact: Anyone who is exposed to the fungus that causes athlete’s foot can get infected. The fungus likes to grow in warm, moist environments, such as locker rooms, showers, and swimming pools.
    • Myth: Athlete’s foot is the same as jock itch.
    • Fact: Athlete’s foot and jock itch are caused by the same type of fungus (dermatophytes), but they affect different parts of the body. Athlete’s foot affects the feet, while jock itch affects the groin area.
    • Myth: Showering regularly can prevent athlete’s foot.
    • Fact: Showering alone won’t prevent athlete’s foot. You need to dry your feet completely after each shower and avoid sharing towels, socks, or shoes with someone who has athlete’s foot. You should also wear shoes that allow your feet to breathe and change your socks often if you sweat a lot .

    FAQ About Athlete’s Foot

    Who is at risk of getting athlete’s foot?

    Anyone who is exposed to the fungus that causes athlete’s foot can get infected. However, it most commonly affects men and people over the age of 60. You may be more likely to develop athlete’s foot if you have diabetes, obesity, a weakened immune system, tissue damage or wounds on your feet.

    Is athlete’s foot contagious?

    Yes, athlete’s foot is contagious and can spread through direct contact with an infected person or indirect contact with contaminated surfaces or objects. You can also spread it from your feet to other parts of your body, especially if you scratch or pick the infected area.

    Can I get athlete’s foot from my pet?

    Yes, you can get athlete’s foot from your pet if they have a fungal infection on their skin or nails. The same fungus that causes ringworm in animals can also cause athlete’s foot in humans. You should avoid touching your pet’s infected area and wash your hands after handling them. You should also take your pet to the vet for treatment.

    Can I wear nail polish if I have athlete’s foot?

    It is not advisable to wear nail polish if you have athlete’s foot because it can trap moisture and create a favorable environment for the fungus to grow. Nail polish can also prevent the medication from reaching the infected area and interfere with the healing process. You should remove any nail polish from your toenails before starting treatment for athlete’s foot.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for athlete’s foot?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for Athlete’s Foot to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Ringworm (Tinea Corporis)

    What are Ringworm (Tinea Corporis)?

    Ringworm is a fungal skin infection that affects the top layer of the skin and causes a circular, ring-shaped rash. The medical name for ringworm is Tinea Corporis, which refers to ringworm of the body. The rash can be itchy and can spread to other areas if not treated. Ringworm is a common and highly contagious skin condition that can be treated with antifungal medication.

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    What are the causes of Ringworm?

    Ringworm is caused by a fungal infection. There are several species of fungi that can cause ringworm, including dermatophytes, yeasts, and molds. These fungi thrive in warm, moist environments and can infect the skin through direct contact with contaminated surfaces, animals, or other people. People with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS, are at higher risk for developing ringworm. Additionally, poor hygiene, sweating, and wearing tight clothing can also increase the risk of getting ringworm.

    What are the symptoms of Ringworm?

    • Rash: A round, red, and itchy rash that may be scaly, bumpy, or blistery.
    • Ring-shaped lesion: The rash forms a ring-like shape, which is why the condition is called “ringworm.”
    • Itching: The affected skin may be itchy and may become more itchy at night.
    • Blisters: In some cases, blisters may form on the rash.
    • Loss of hair: If the scalp is affected, hair may fall out in patches.

    It is important to note that some people with ringworm may not experience any symptoms. If you think you may have ringworm, it is best to see a dermatologist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

    What treatments are available for Ringworm?

    The following treatments are commonly used for ringworm:

    • Topical antifungal medications: Over-the-counter creams and ointments, such as clotrimazole and terbinafine, can be applied directly to the affected skin to treat ringworm.
    • Oral antifungal medications: If the infection is severe or widespread, a doctor may prescribe oral antifungal medications, such as itraconazole or fluconazole.
    • Antibiotics: In some cases, if a bacterial infection has developed in addition to the fungal infection, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the ringworm.

    It is important to follow the instructions of the dermatologist or pharmacist when using any of these medications. Treatment typically lasts for several weeks and it is important to complete the entire course of treatment to ensure that the infection is fully treated. In some cases, the ringworm may return after treatment, so it is important to monitor your skin and seek medical attention if necessary.

    dermatology-consultation

    How to Help Prevent Ringworm?

    To help prevent ringworm, you can follow these steps:

    • Practice good hygiene: Wash your hands regularly and keep your skin clean.
    • Avoid sharing personal items: Don’t share towels, brushes, combs, and other personal items that come into contact with your skin.
    • Keep your skin dry: Keep your skin dry, especially after exercising or sweating, as moisture can help the fungus grow.
    • Wear appropriate clothing: Wear clothing that covers your skin, especially in warm and humid environments.
    • Avoid contact with infected people or animals: If you come into contact with someone or an animal with ringworm, wash your hands thoroughly.
    • Clean contaminated surfaces: Clean surfaces that may be contaminated with ringworm, such as gym equipment, with a disinfectant.
    • Keep your living environment clean and dry: Make sure your home is clean and well-ventilated to prevent the growth of fungal organisms.

    FAQ About Ringworm

    How is ringworm transmitted?

    Ringworm can be transmitted through direct contact with an infected person or animal, or through contact with contaminated surfaces or objects.

    How long does it take for ringworm to go away?

    The length of time it takes for ringworm to go away varies, but most cases can be treated within 4 to 6 weeks.

    Can ringworm be prevented?

    Yes, practicing good hygiene and avoiding direct contact with infected people or animals can help prevent the spread of ringworm.

    Is ringworm contagious?

    Yes, ringworm is highly contagious and can be easily spread through direct contact or contaminated surfaces.

    Can ringworm spread to other parts of the body?

    Yes, ringworm can spread from one part of the body to another if the affected area is not properly treated and covered.

    What should I do if I think I have ringworm?

    If you suspect you have ringworm, it’s important to see a doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment.

    Are there any home remedies for ringworm?

    While some home remedies may help relieve the symptoms of ringworm, it’s important to seek medical treatment for proper and effective treatment. Over-the-counter creams or ointments may provide temporary relief, but they do not cure the infection.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for ringworm?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offers treatment for Ringworm to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Lyme Disease

    What is Lyme Disease?

    Lyme disease is an infectious illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia Burgdorferi. It is most commonly spread through the bite of infected black-legged ticks, which are often found in tall grass and wooded areas. In some cases, the bacterium can also be transmitted through the bite of other species of ticks, as well as through contaminated needles or during blood transfusions.

    large-tick-sits-person-s-finger

    What are the causes of Lyme Disease?

    You contract lyme disease when you receive an infected deer tick bite. The bacteria enter your body through the bite and then make their way to your bloodstream. To transmit the illness, a tick must be attached to your skin and feeding for an extensive time period. The longer a tick goes undiscovered, the greater the risk of Lyme disease. You cannot catch Lyme disease from another person.

    What are the symptoms of Lyme Disease?

    Because Lyme disease can affect different parts of the body, not all cases show symptoms in the same way. Generally though, signs of Lyme disease include:

    • Red, bulls-eye like rash
    • Flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills and fatigue
    • Intense joint pain and swelling
    • Neurological concerns, especially in untreated cases

    What treatments are available for Lyme Disease?

    The treatment for Lyme disease typically involves antibiotics, which can effectively cure the infection if given in the early stages. Common antibiotics used to treat Lyme disease include doxycycline, amoxicillin, and cefuroxime axetil.

    In cases of early-stage Lyme disease, antibiotics are usually given orally and may be taken for several weeks. In more severe cases or in cases of late-stage Lyme disease, intravenous antibiotics may be required.

    In addition to antibiotics, patients with Lyme disease may also be treated with over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, to relieve symptoms like joint pain and headaches.

    It is important to note that some people may continue to experience symptoms even after treatment with antibiotics. This is known as post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS) and may require additional medical attention.

    How to Help Prevent Lyme Disease

    There are several steps you can take to help prevent Lyme disease:

    • Avoid tick-infested areas: Try to avoid spending time in tall grass or wooded areas, especially during peak tick season, which is usually from late spring to early fall.

    • Wear protective clothing: When spending time in areas where ticks are prevalent, wear long pants and sleeves, and tuck your pants into your socks to keep ticks from reaching your skin.

    • Use insect repellent: Apply an insect repellent containing DEET or permethrin to your skin and clothing to help keep ticks at bay.

    • Check for ticks: Regularly check your skin, clothing, and gear for ticks, especially after spending time outdoors. Remove any ticks you find promptly and carefully.

    • Maintain a tick-free yard: Keep your yard tidy and mow the lawn regularly to reduce the risk of ticks. You can also treat your yard with tick-killing chemicals and keep pets on tick preventive medication.

    • Seek prompt treatment: If you experience symptoms of Lyme disease, such as a bull’s-eye rash or flu-like symptoms, seek prompt medical attention. Early treatment is essential for preventing serious complications and ensuring a successful recovery.

    By taking these preventive measures, you can reduce your risk of contracting Lyme disease and enjoy outdoor activities with peace of mind.

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    FAQ About Lyme Disease

    How is Lyme disease transmitted?

    The bacterium that causes Lyme disease is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks.

    Can Lyme disease be transmitted from person to person?

    There have been rare reports of transmission of the bacterium that causes Lyme disease through contaminated needles, blood transfusions, and sexual contact, but the primary mode of transmission is through tick bites.

    What should I do if I think I have been bitten by a tick?

    If you have been bitten by a tick, remove the tick promptly and carefully. If you develop symptoms of Lyme disease, such as a bull’s-eye rash or flu-like symptoms, seek prompt medical attention.

    When should I see a dermatologist for Lyme disease?

    If you develop a bull’s-eye rash or suspect you have been bitten by a tick, it is important to see a dermatologist promptly. A dermatologist can diagnose Lyme disease and provide appropriate treatment.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for Lyme disease?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for Lyme disease to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Psoriasis

    What is Psoriasis?

    An estimated 7.5 million Americans suffer with psoriasis, a non-contagious, chronic skin condition. Often identified by patches of red, scaly skin, psoriasis occurs when the immune system sends out incorrect signals that cause skin cells to grow too quickly. With psoriasis, cells build up on the top layer of skin, creating patches of itchy, dry skin. The most common locations for psoriasis are on the elbows, knees, or trunk, but it can develop anywhere on the body.

    Psoriasis is thought to be an autoimmune disease, which arises from an overactive response by the body towards substances and tissues normally present in the body. In the case of psoriasis, white blood cells, called T cells, attack healthy skin as if to fight off infection or heal a wound. Instead of new cells moving to the outermost layer of skin in a normal manner, they develop more rapidly. The dead skin can’t slough off fast enough to keep up, so thick, scaly areas form on the skin’s surface.

    Usually, the first occurrence of psoriasis happens sometime between ages 15 to 35.   However, approximately 20,000 children under age 10 also live with psoriasis. Although psoriasis seems to have a genetic component, not everyone with that gene develops the disease.

    psoriasis on arm

    What are the signs and symptoms of Psoriasis?

    Each case differs based on the individual, but people with psoriasis often experience at least one of the following symptoms:

    • Burning, itching, or soreness
    • Cracked, dry skin that can bleed
    • Patches of red skin with silvery scales
    • Pitted, ridged, or thickened nails
    • Stiff, swollen joints

    If you think that you could have psoriasis, contact your doctor and schedule a complete exam.

    Triggers
    Because psoriasis is chronic, anyone with the condition will live with a cycle of flare-ups and remissions over a lifetime. Typically, patients with psoriasis may develop initial symptoms or experience flare ups because of various triggers, including

    • Certain medications
    • Cuts, scrapes, burns, or other damage to the skin
    • Diet
    • Excessive alcohol use
    • Other infections such as strep throat
    • Smoking
    • Stress
    • Weather

    What are the different types of Psoriasis?

    There are six main types of psoriasis:

    1) Plaque Psoriasis (Psoriasis Vulgaris)

    About 80 percent of people diagnosed with the disease have plaque psoriasis, or psoriasis vulgaris. Plaque psoriasis often appears as on the elbows, knees, and lower trunk in the form of raised, red lesions topped with silvery scales.

    2) Guttate Psoriasis
    Usually found on the limbs or trunk, guttate psoriasis primarily appears in patients younger than age 30. Guttate psoriasis presents as small, water-drop-shaped sores and can occur because of an illness or injury to the skin.

    3) Inverse Psoriasis
    With inverse psoriasis, patients develop smooth, shiny lesions that are bright red in color. Most often seen in people who are overweight, inverse psoriasis strikes the armpits, around the genitals, near the groin, and under the breasts.

    4) Pustular Psoriasis
    When you have pustular psoriasis, white blisters filled with pus and surrounded by red skin will appear either in localized areas or all over your body. Because the pus is made of white blood cells, it is not contagious. Certain things can trigger pustular psoriasis, such as irritating topical treatments, infections, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation, and stress.

    5) Erythrodermic Psoriasis
    Characterized by a fiery red rash coupled with extreme burning or itching, erythrodermic psoriasis is the least common kind of psoriasis. Triggers for erythrodermic psoriasis include severe sunburn, corticosteroids, other medications, or another type of psoriasis that has flared up.

    6) Psoriatic Arthritis
    In addition to causing pitted, discolored nails, psoriatic arthritis also presents with the swollen, painful joints that often accompany arthritis. Usually psoriatic arthritis isn’t as crippling as other forms of arthritis, but it can cause stiffness and progressive joint damage.

    What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Psoriasis?

    Currently, no cure exists for psoriasis. Treatments are designed to minimize discomfort and encourage healing. When determining the best treatment, your doctor will take into account the severity of the psoriasis. Mild to moderate psoriasis covers 3 to 10 percent of your body, while psoriasis is considered moderate to severe when it covers more than 10 percent.

    Treating Mild to Moderate Psoriasis
    If you have mild to moderate psoriasis, your doctor will likely recommend a combination of over-the-counter medications, prescription topical treatments, and light therapy/phototherapy.

    Over-the-Counter (OTC) Medications
    The two active ingredients in over-the-counter medications approved by the FDA for psoriasis are coal tar, which inhibits the quick overgrowth of cells, and salicylic acid, which makes the outer layer of skin shed. Other OTC treatments may help, like:

    • Scale lifters to loosen and eliminate scales so that medicine can penetrate the sores
    • Bath solutions, such as Epsom salts, Dead Sea salts, or oilated oatmeal, that reduce itching and remove scaling
    • Occlusion, which covers the areas treated with topical treatments applications, to improve absorption and effectiveness
    • Anti-itch products like calamine lotion or hydrocortisone creams
    • Moisturizers to keep skin hydrated, reduce symptoms, and encourage healing

    Prescription Topicals
    Designed to inhibit the overgrowth of cells and lessen inflammation, prescription topicals include:

    • Anthralin, which reduces the skin cell growth related to plaque
    • Calcipotriene will flattens lesions, removes scales, and slow cell growth. Often used in treatment of psoriasis on the scalp and nails.
    • Calcipotriene and Betamethasone Dipropionate. By combining Calcipotriene with betamethasone dipropionate, this treatment addresses the itch and inflammation common to psoriasis as well as flattening lesions, removing scales, and minimizing cell growth.
    • Calcitriol, an active form of vitamin D3, helps limit extraneous skin cell production
    • Tazarotene, a topical retinoid that slows down cell growth
    • Topical steroids are the most commonly used medications for psoriasis, and they work by reducing inflammation, swelling, and redness

    Phototherapy (light therapy)
    Exposure to ultraviolet light can provide relief from psoriasis. With careful monitoring, the UVA and UVB rays from the sun can reduce symptoms. Excimer lasers treat specific areas affected by psoriasis, while pulse dye lasers provide not only targeted treatment, but also destroy the blood vessels that promote the development of psoriasis.

    Treating Moderate to Severe Psoriasis
    For patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, treatment involves prescription medications, biologics and phototherapy (light therapy).

    Prescription Medications
    Based on the location, severity, and type of psoriasis, your doctor will prescribe an oral medication, such as acitretin, cyclosporine and methotrexate.

    hands-patient-suffering-from-psoriasis

    How does psoriasis affect your nails, eyes, and joints?

    • Nails: Psoriasis can cause changes in the appearance and structure of the nails, such as pitting, discoloration, thickening, loosening, or crumbling. These changes can affect the function and comfort of the nails, as well as the self-esteem of the person with psoriasis.
    • Eyes: Psoriasis can cause inflammation in the eyes, leading to a condition called uveitis. Uveitis can cause symptoms such as eye pain, redness, blurred vision, sensitivity to light, or floaters. If left untreated, uveitis can damage the eye and impair vision.
    • Joints: Psoriasis can cause inflammation in the joints, resulting in a type of arthritis called psoriatic arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis can cause symptoms such as joint pain, stiffness, swelling, reduced range of motion, or deformity. Psoriatic arthritis can affect any joint in the body, but it is more common in the fingers, toes, spine, and pelvis. Psoriatic arthritis can also affect the tendons and ligaments that attach to the bones.

    FAQ About Psoriasis

    Can psoriasis affect other parts of the body besides the skin?

    Psoriasis can affect other parts of the body besides the skin, such as the nails, scalp and joints. In some cases, it may also be associated with other conditions such as psoriatic arthritis.

    Can certain foods trigger psoriasis?

    Certain foods, such as processed foods, alcohol, and gluten-containing foods, may trigger psoriasis in some individuals. It’s important for people with psoriasis to work with a dermatologist or a dietitian to identify any specific food triggers and to develop a diet plan that works best for them.

    When should I see a dermatologist for psoriasis?

    If you have symptoms of psoriasis, such as red, scaly patches on the skin, it’s important to see a dermatologist for proper diagnosis and treatment. A dermatologist can also help to develop an individualized treatment plan and provide guidance on how to manage the condition. If your symptoms persist or worsen, you should also consult with a dermatologist.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for psoriasis?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for psoriasis to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Intertrigo

    What is Intertrigo?

    Intertrigo is a skin condition that occurs when skin rubs against skin, causing friction, inflammation, and sometimes infection. It usually affects the areas where the skin folds, such as the armpits, groin, under the breasts, or between the toes. It can cause a red or reddish-brown rash with small bumps or spots, itching, burning, stinging, or pain in the affected areasIntertrigo is not contagious, but it can be worsened by bacteria, fungi, or viruses that grow in the warm and moist environment of the skin foldsIntertrigo can be treated with topical or oral medications, barrier ointments, drying solutions, and lifestyle changes.

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    What are the causes of Intertrigo?

    Some of the causes of intertrigo are:

    • Moisture and heat in the skin folds, which create an ideal environment for bacteria and fungi to grow.
    • Sweat, urine, feces, or saliva, which can irritate the skin and increase the risk of infection.
    • Obesity, diabetes, or poor hygiene, which can make the skin folds more prone to intertrigo.
    • Certain medications, such as chemotherapy drugs, which can weaken the immune system and make the skin more sensitive.
    • Other skin conditions, such as psoriasis, eczema, or seborrheic dermatitis, which can increase the inflammation and itching in the skin folds.

    What are the signs and symptoms of Intertrigo?

    Intertrigo is a skin condition that occurs when skin rubs against skin, causing friction, inflammation, and sometimes infection. Some of the signs and symptoms of intertrigo are:

    • A red or reddish-brown rash with small bumps or spots in the areas where the skin folds, such as the armpits, groin, under the breasts, or between the toes.
    • Itching, burning, stinging, or pain in the affected areas.
    • The rash may be symmetrical (appearing on both sides of the skin fold) or asymmetrical (appearing on one side only).
    • The rash may be wet and soft (macerated) or dry and scaly.
    • The rash may have plaques (raised, scaly lesions), papules (small bumps), or pustules (pimple-like bumps) if there is a fungal or bacterial infection.

    How to Help Prevent Intertrigo

    Here are some ways to help prevent intertrigo:

    • Keep skin folds clean and dry: Wipe away sweat and other bodily fluids regularly and use a clean, dry cloth to dry the affected area thoroughly.

    • Wear loose-fitting clothing: Tight clothing can trap moisture and create a breeding ground for bacteria and fungi, so it’s important to wear loose-fitting, breathable clothing.

    • Avoid synthetic fibers: Synthetic fibers trap heat and moisture, so opt for natural fibers such as cotton when choosing clothing.

    • Use antifungal powder: Dusting antifungal powder in skin folds can help prevent the growth of yeast and other fungi.

    • Maintain a healthy weight: Excess weight can create more skin folds and increase the risk of intertrigo.

    • Keep skin folds aired out: Allowing skin folds to air out regularly can help prevent intertrigo by reducing moisture levels.

    • Avoid skin-on-skin contact: Avoiding skin-on-skin contact in skin folds can help prevent friction and reduce the risk of intertrigo.

    • Practice good hygiene: Regularly bathing and using soap to clean skin folds can help reduce bacteria and fungus levels.

    Remember, if you experience symptoms of intertrigo, it’s important to seek treatment as soon as possible to prevent complications.

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    FAQ About Intertrigo

    Who is at risk of developing intertrigo?

    Individuals who are overweight, have skin folds due to obesity, or suffer from excessive sweating are at a higher risk of developing intertrigo.

    How is intertrigo diagnosed?

    Intertrigo is diagnosed through a physical examination of the affected skin folds.

    What are the complications of intertrigo?

    Complications of intertrigo include bacterial or fungal infections, which can cause a worsening of symptoms.

    Is intertrigo contagious?

    Intertrigo is not contagious, but it can be spread to other skin folds if not properly treated.

    Can intertrigo be cured permanently?

    While intertrigo can be managed and treated, it may not be cured permanently in some individuals who are prone to skin irritation in skin folds.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for intertrigo?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for intertrigo to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Molluscum Contagiosum

    What is Molluscum Contagiosum?

    Most often seen in children, molluscum contagiosum is a common viral infection. This virus affects the outer layer of skin and does not usually move through the body. The firm, skin-colored bumps that develop from molluscum contagiosum usually disappear within a year on their own but doctors often recommend treatment to keep the virus from spreading. Molluscum contagiosum can appear in adults and, if it involves the genitals in the adult cases, it is considered a sexually transmitted disease. People with weakened immune systems are more susceptible to the virus as well.

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    What are the signs and symptoms of Molluscum Contagiosum?

    Generally, molluscum contagiosum produces little white, pink or flesh-colored bumps that have a dimple or pit in the center. In most people, the growths range in size from about two to five millimeters in diameter. Molluscum contagiosum often appears on the face, neck, abdomen, arms, legs, or genitalia.

    What are the causes of Molluscum Contagiosum?

    The molluscum contagiosum virus, a member of the poxvirus family, enters your skin through hair follicles, pores, or abrasions on the skin’s surface. Highly contagious, the virus spreads by person-to-person contact, sexual contact with an infected partner, or through contact with contaminated objects like toys, door knobs, or faucets. Scratching, rubbing and shaving the papules can spread the virus to other areas of skin.

    What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Molluscum Contagiosum?

    Your doctor will need to destroy the infection-causing cores inside the papules. Once this core is destroyed, the infection will heal. Several methods can be utilized to eliminate these cores:

    • Chemical agents to remove the infected skin
    • Cryotherapy to freeze the areas and kill the infection
    • Curette, scalpel, or other cutting device to surgically remove them
    • Lasers to destroy the infected cells
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    FAQ About Molluscum Contagiosum

    Is molluscum contagiosum contagious?

    Yes, molluscum contagiosum is contagious until all the bumps have gone away. The virus can be spread from one part of the body to another or from one person to another through direct contact with the bumps or objects that have touched them.

    Is molluscum contagiosum dangerous?

    No, molluscum contagiosum is not dangerous in most cases. It is a mild and harmless infection that does not cause serious complications. However, it can cause discomfort, embarrassment, or anxiety for some people. It can also interfere with sexual pleasure or intimacy. In rare cases, it can cause secondary infections, eye problems, or widespread lesions in people with weakened immune systems.

    Can molluscum contagiosum recur?

    Yes, molluscum contagiosum can recur if a person is exposed to the virus again. The infection does not provide immunity against future infections. Therefore, it is possible to get molluscum contagiosum more than once in a lifetime.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in Denver that offers treatment for molluscum contagiosum?

    Yes. At our Denver dermatology office we offer treatment for molluscum contagiosum to patients from Denver and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.